YUGEN –  Exhibition

2014-10-28

Depot Gallery ||  October –  November 2014 – 2 Danks Street, Waterloo Sydney

www.2danksstreet.com

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ONE MOON MANY WATERS – Exhibition

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2013-06-19 – Solo Exhibition: One Moon Many Waters. 

ART MONTH SPEED DATING 

Participant as one of 20 emerging artists to be selected to show my work to various prominent Galleries, art writers and curators.

Up and coming solo exhibition: One Moon, Many Waters

Depot Gallery II  June 22, 2013 – 2 Danks Street Depot, Waterloo Sydney

www2danksstreet.com.au

PAINTING AS PRESENCE

2012-10-04

MOP Projects  2/39 Abercrombie Street, Chippendale, Sydney.  http://www.mop.org.au

Below – Lindy Lee, Matthew Allen, Marisa Purcell and moi.

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PORTIA GEACH MEMORIAL AWARD 2012

2012-09-28

S.H. ERVIN GALLERY, The Rocks, Sydney.   www.shervingallery.com.au – Finalist with Portrait of Nell. NELL WITH SAINT SHELL.

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MONO NO AWARE

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2012-07-27

RED DOOR GALLERY – 73 Beattie St Balmain. Exhibition

“Mono no aware gave name to an aesthetic that already existed in Japanese art, music and poetry, the source of which can be traced directly to the introduction of Zen Buddhism in the twelth century, a spiritual philosophy and practise which profoundly influenced all aspects of Japanese culture, but especially art and religion. The fleeting nature of beauty described by mono no aware derives from the three states of esistence in Buddhist philosophy: unsatisfactoriness, impersonality, and most importantly in this context, impermanence. Mono no aware states that beauty is a subjective rather than objective experience, a state of being ultimately internal rather than external.”

Jaitra. Sensitivity to Things.

CLOUD MUSIC

2011-02-17

New drawings created whilst artist in residence at La Macina di San Cresci, Italy.

RED DOOR GALLERY Balmain Sydney – 02 98108838

ANNUAL SMALL WORKS CHRISTMAS EXHIBITION

EDWINA CORLETTE GALLERY

28 Nov – 15 Dec 2010 – 555 BRUNSWICK STREET | NEW FARM  4005  QUEENSLAND |  AUSTRALIA

BEYOND THE FIELD

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Recent paintings by Maria Gorton, Matthew Allen and Marisa Purcell

October 2010,

Bondi Pavilion Gallery,Bondi Pavilion, Queen Elizabeth Drive, Bondi Beach.

Maria Gorton, Matthew Allen and Marisa Purcell first met at Sydney College of the Arts in 2006 when undergoing their Masters of Visual Arts under the supervision of Lindy Lee. The artists shared a fascination with colour field painting, the sublime and the philosophy of nonduality. Their paintings unite in this exhibition through an exploration of colour and space, light and dark, memory and time. Maria Gorton, Matthew Allen and Marisa Purcellʼs common language is the unknown. As a musician plucks sounds from the aether and a writer groups words from an endless pool – these painters layer colour and form from an infinite field of connections. Rarely pre-determined, the paintings culminate in paintings that trace the process of discovery itself. Visitors to this exhibition will be entranced by large abstract, and minimal paintings that engage the viewer both on an emotional and physical level. Intense colour sit alongside the deepest shades and seem to suspend time.

ITALY – ARTIST RESIDENCY.

2010-07-06

Artist residency program at La Macina Di San Cresci, Italy. October 2010

www.chianticom.com

NEW YORK SHOW – JADITE GALLERIES

Solo Exhibition:

New York in 2010 at Jadite Galleries, – 413 West 50th Street, New York.

April 2010.

www.jadite.com

IMMORTAL ECHO – Jadite Gallery April 2010

Judaism is a spiritual practice that is based on structures of interpretation of meaning. Pardes – meaning garden – is the Judaic term that describes how every work has four levels of meaning, from the literal, through the allegorical and metaphorical, to the mystical. The profound effect of this culture of interpretation is that rather than arriving at a clarity of meaning, this multiplicity sums up to an ambiguity and an uncertainty that provokes an emotional response.

At the heart of Gorton’s work is a multi-levelled and emotional response to the essence of her spiritual practice as a Zen Buddhist. Philosophical and existential, the idea of the void is an unrepresentable and almost mystical state of being.

Is it possible to represent absense? Or the profound consciousness of a void?

Mountains, valleys, lakes and figures of snakes and spheres, seem to bleed light into darkness. In some of the triptychs, a landscape is architecturally deconstructed by the panel next to it. Like an x-raying process, where the x-ray and the x-rayed bleed into each other.

The profound beauty of a work that presents multiple levels of meaning is that all the meanings effect all the others. The atmosphere of the literal is infused with the colour and meaning of the mystical. This metaphoric ambiguity presents an emotional state, and a tone that carries the conscious. In this landscape your personal, emotional response to the mystical can be intoned into the literal.

In this landscape the void might be represented.

Max Lyandvert.

If one considers the prominent points of demarcation between areas of sky, sea and mountains that make up Gorton’s compositions, from some distance, the latter forms, which loom most broodingly, could almost appear to be silhouettes. Until the viewer draws closer and observes how sensuously Gorton builds her surfaces with successive layers of thinned oil pigment, creating subtle tonal modulations, “breathing paint on the canvas” as Rothko put it. The darkly saturated mountainous shapes dominate ‘The Calling’ and ‘Time Being’ and the show’s title work, ‘Immortal Echo’, where they veer up on both sides as though about to encircle and consume the moon. By contrast, the single sharply desending slope in the right panel of  ‘Other Side of Being’ vies for visual primacy with the Zen emptiness of the single overall tone in the left one. And the hard-edge rectangular forms, introduced by Gorton in the central panels of the triptychs ‘Passage Blue’ and ‘The Dark Makes One’, penetrate the two dimensional picture plane like metaphysical corridors leading to wide open doors of transcendence and enlightenment.

Ed McCormack

GALLERY & STUDIO Magazine, New York. April/May 2010 Vol.12 No.4

ITALY – CASTELLO DE GALEAZZA

Castello Di Galeazza, Bologna, Italy, curated by Clark Lawrence

November 2009.

Maria Gorton’s paintings, both landscape and abstract works, have nothing to do with her country, one she has ever visited, or any place in this world; they are about infinite spaces – representations of the void.

Artists have been painting the void for centuries. It’s in that dark empty space behind the penetrating stare of Rembrandt’s self portraits, it’s what the German painter Casper David Friedrich captured 200 years ago in the misty mountains and vast landscapes that his solitary people look upon. It’s the infamous black square of Kazmir Malevich, exhibited 94 years ago in Petrograd. It is the very essence of the later and most powerful paintings by Mark Rothko, who more than any other artist, inspires Maria Gorton.

ROME – GALLERIA TONDINELLI.

Installation Italy
Installation Italy

2009-04-01

Solo Exhibition April 7-30, THE SOUND OF ANCIENT BLUE. Curated by Costanzo Costantini and Floriana Tondinelli. Opened by The Hon Amanda Vanstone, Australia’s Ambassador to Italy.

Maria Gorton, who lives and works in Sydney Australia, will be exhibiting for the first time in Italy at Galleria Tondinelli. Featuring her latest body of work, ‘The Sound of Ancient Blue’. These paintings are intimate places, spaces of the soul. Gorton’s careful and sensitive quest, expresses her pictorial poetics, through the use of multilayered works of iridescent superimpositions. Formal balance and conceptual depth convey the sense of painting which is cultured and disquieting in its silence.